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Why you should NEVER paint your pool

Posted on Nov 20, 2019 |

Why you should NEVER paint your pool

From time to time we have homeowners that contact us, asking if we can repaint their pools. Painting your swimming pool might seem like a quick and inexpensive alternative to resurfacing your swimming pool but we strongly discourage anyone from painting their pools.

Painting your swimming pool will cost you more in the long run when it comes time to resurface your pool. Pool finishes are a concrete-based product that over time, interacts with the chemicals in your pool water and calcifies. This chemical process, over time, will cause your pool finish to pit, etch, or otherwise become uneven due to the chemicals in your water causing the pool finish to disintegrate. When swimming pools are resurfaced, this problem can be addressed. However, applying a paint or epoxy finish over your existing pool surface will not correct any of etching or pitting.

Additionally, painting your pool will lead to other issues. The chemicals added to your pool water interact with and break down the paint. Most often, this causes the paint to become chalky, causing the water to become cloudy. This chalky residue can get on swimmer’s skin, staining swimmers’ skin and bathing suits or clothing. Pool paint often cracks and flakes off which can also clog and cause damage to your pool filter.

If your pool has already been painted, in order to properly resurface your pool, the paint will need to be sand blasted, wet blasted, or otherwise mechanically removed back to the original surface in order to create a tight, bondable surface. If the paint is not completely removed prior to resurfacing your pool, it can lead to a bonding failure, where the new pool finish delaminates (separates) from the underlying surface.

As there are so many different paints and epoxy-type products on the market today, removing the painted surface can be difficult, expensive, and hard to price because it is often difficult to determine what product was used. This cost of removal will have to be added on to the cost of refinishing the pool, which can sometimes cost as much as resurfacing.

If you have a painted concrete pool and you would like to bring it back to its original surface, or if your pool needs to be refinished, please give Advanced Pool & Spa a call. Advanced Pool & Spa is family owned and operated and has been proudly serving the Tampa Bay area for the 35 years! We have the experience to help you with all your pool, spa, and deck remodeling needs! Please take a look at our website, advancedpool-spa.com, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Instagram to see some of our beautiful work!

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Caring for your Residential Pool Verses Caring for your Residential Spa

Posted on Sep 6, 2019 |

Caring for your Residential Pool Verses Caring for your Residential Spa

From time to time people think that the maintenance and water treatment programs for spas and hot tubs (hereinafter “spas”) is the same as water treatment and maintenance for swimming pools. However, swimming pools and spas are very different bodies of water and their maintenance must be approached in different ways.

The difference in size and temperature between residential pools and spas prompts the need for a distinct approach to maintenance. For example, the average temperature range for a swimming pool is between 79–84 degrees Fahrenheit, whereas the typical spa ranges from 98–104 degrees. In spas, higher temperatures, along with numerous jets, leads to a much higher rate of evaporation than in swimming pools. Without the proper maintenance program and attention to water chemistry, the higher rate of evaporation can lead higher calcium levels and scaling. Likewise, because spas are much smaller, one person in a backyard spa is equivalent to approximately 83 people in a backyard swimming pool. The size difference between swimming pools and spas also means, that variations in chemicals has a greater impact on the water’s pH (measure of the acids or bases in the water).

Maintaining the proper water chemistry in your spa is extremely important. Proper maintenance and appropriate water treatments can help to prolong the life of your spa’s surface and components (i.e. jets, pumps, and blowers). Perhaps even more important, proper water chemistry is key to a sanitary spa.

When a person enters a swimming pool or spa, they bring with them germs. Due to their small size, this waste places a greater load on the chemicals being used to keep the spa sanitary and safe. The smaller size and higher temperatures of spa create a higher risk of infection than in a pool. Fortunately, according to the Center for Disease Control, the appropriate maintenance schedule and water treatment plan (including maintaining the proper pH and sanitizing program) makes the risk of infection low.

The foundation of spa chemistry is establishing the proper alkalinity. Without proper alkalinity, pH cannot be properly adjusted. For a spa, the total alkalinity should be between 80–120 parts per million (“ppm”).

Once the proper alkalinity is established, it is imperative to establish the proper pH. The lower the pH, the more acidic the water and the higher the pH, the more alkaline the water. If the pH is too low (too acidic) it can cause etching on the spa’s finish and be abrasive on the spa’s components. A pH that is too high can lead to problems with scale and calcium deposits. Achieving and maintaining a proper pH is critical for the longevity of your spa’s finish and components.

Ensuring that your spa is sanitary is key to the health of its users. Chlorine and bromine are the chemicals most frequently used to sanitize a spa. If sanitizing with chlorine, the proper level is approximately 3 ppm and if using bromine, the proper level should be between 4–6 ppm. Often, spa owners opt to use bromine instead of chlorine because it does not break down as quickly in hot water as chlorine.

Spas should also be shocked regularly. It is important to try to “shock” your spa with a higher amount of sanitizer after each use (regardless of whether there was one person in the spa or multiple people). Because chlorine and bromine break down in the high temperatures, the “shock” provides an additional sanitizing boost to the water. Additionally, water clarifiers should be used to help prevent the spa from becoming cloudy and should be implemented as part of your regular spa maintenance program.

With regular maintenance, your spa can remain beautiful, clean, and well-functioning for years. When it is time for a remodel or if you are ready for a change, Advanced Pool & Spa Inc., can assist you with your spa (and swimming pool) resurfacing and remodeling needs. Please visit our gallery at http://www.advancedpool-spa.com/gallery/ to look at some of our beautiful work!

 

 

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Is There Scale in Your Pool?

Posted on Jan 29, 2019 |

Is There Scale in Your Pool?

poolscalebeforeThe white film around the water lines of your swimming pool is unsightly; but it may also indicate some imperfections in your water chemistry. Scale is the crystalline build-up of inorganic materials – most often the mineral calcium – found in pool shells composed of plaster, ceramic tile, fiberglass, stone and other surfaces commonly found in commercial applications. Consider the following methods for the prevention and removal of calcium-based scale and deposits:

Test regularly to ensure that calcium hardness levels are between approximately 200 to 400 parts per million.

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All about Diatomaceous Earth Filters

Posted on Jan 21, 2016 |

All about Diatomaceous Earth Filters

No swimming pool is usable without a filter, but why? When the pool water is forced through a filter, the material inside of the filter traps dirt and debris before returning the filtered water back to the pool. In fact, legal requirements exist in most areas that dictate how quickly pool water must flow through the filtering system. Such guidelines are meant to ensure that the pool water is guaranteed to be clean and safe at all times.

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Is Your Pool Ready for the Winter?

Posted on Jan 7, 2016 |

Is Your Pool Ready for the Winter?

Caring for a pool up north is a bit different than doing so down south, especially in Florida, where pools don’t need to be drained between October and May. Though you may not need to fully winterize your backyard pool as a southerner, you still have a few important steps to take to ensure that the colder January and February weather doesn’t cause any avoidable damage to your backyard water playground.

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Easy Steps for Opening and Maintaining Your Pool

Posted on Apr 9, 2015 |

Easy Steps for Opening and Maintaining Your Pool

As winter becomes a memory, opening the swimming pool often becomes a top priority for many families. The good news is opening your pool and keeping it in top condition throughout the summer is easy. Here is a simple, easy way to open your pool this year.

It generally takes two days to open your pool properly, so make sure you have this amount of time available. Also, get all of your supplies ready. You will need the following:

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